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The Future of Land Use Science

Journal of Land Use Science

The Journal of Land Use Science was the first journal to focus on scientific discovery and advancement in the field of land-system science.

Land systems are the interface between natural and social systems. Understanding the inextricable interdependence of these systems is necessary to understand change in land use, link land use to impacts, and to predict outcomes of land-system changes on society and nature.

Contributions to the Journal of Land Use Science feature analyses of critical, timely trends that include changes in forest, agriculture and urban systems, which have implications for food and energy regimes as well as for ecosystem services and biodiversity across spatial scales and geographic regions. Particularly vexing, given complex interactions over time and space, include disentangling direct and indirect effects as well as distal versus proximate interrelations.

There is a great need to understand possible futures in an increasingly globalized world pressured by manifold environmental changes.

Current research featured in the Journal of Land Use Science integrates across the natural and social sciences, using state-of-the-art methods in measuring, monitoring, modeling, and forecasting land systems and their functions. The publications recognize that land systems are not purely economic, but also include political, social, cultural and historical considerations. Likewise, the articles in the Journal of Land Use Science acknowledge that natural systems respond to interacting biotic and abiotic processes.

Read the latest issue of Journal of Land Use Science

Editor's choice

The Editors of the Journal of Land Use Science have compiled two article collections, free for you to read below. These address the future of land use science in an increasingly globalized world, and political, social, cultural and historical considerations of the future of land use science.

If these carefully selected articles influence your research, submit your manuscript to the Journal of Land Use Science here.

The future of land use science in an increasingly globalized world

The following collection addresses the need to understand possible futures in an increasingly globalized world pressured by manifold environmental changes:

TitleAuthorIssue
Accounting for monogastric livestock as a driver in global land use and cover change assessmentsDavid A. Eitelberg, Jasper Van Vliet & Peter H. VerburgDecember 2016
Per-capita estimations of long-term historical land use and the consequences for global change researchKees Klein Goldewijk, Stefan C. Dekker & Jan Luiten van ZandenAugust 2017
Parcels versus pixels: modeling agricultural land use across broad geographic regions using parcel-based field boundariesTerry Sohl, Jordan Dornbierer, Steve Wika, et alJune 2017
Modelling habitat conversion in miombo woodlands: insights from TanzaniaAlex L. Lobora, Cuthbert L. Nahonyo, Linus K. Munishi,May 2017
Uncertainty in establishing forest reference levels and predicting future forest-based carbon stocks for REDD+Ole Mertz, Kenneth Grogan, Dirk Pflugmacher, et alNovember 2017

Political, social, cultural and historical considerations

The following collection considers land systems as not purely economic, but also includes political, social, cultural and historical considerations:

TitleAuthorIssue
Quantifying cultural values associated with deforestation in the Brazilian AmazonJeffrey HoelleMay 2018
Identifying the roots of Green Civil War over utility-scale solar energy projects on public lands across the American SouthwestDustin MulvaneyOctober 2017
A novel participatory and remote-sensing-based approach to mapping annual land use change on forest frontiers in Laos, Myanmar, and MadagascarJulie G. Zaehringer, Jorge C. Llopis, Phokham Latthachack, et alMarch 2018
A confirmation of the indirect impact of sugarcane on deforestation in the AmazonTomas JusysMarch 2017
Tenure diversity and dependent causation in the effects of regional integration on land use: evaluating the evolutionary theory of land rights in Acre, BrazilStephen G. Perz, Jeffrey Hoelle, Karla Rocha, et alMay 2017

Submit to The Journal of Land Use Science

Click on the options below to read the Aims & Scope, Instructions for Authors and to Submit your manuscript.

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