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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Teachers and Teaching

For a Special Issue on
Professional Digital Competence in Teacher Education; where are we, where are we headed and how to get there?

Abstract deadline
30 August 2022

Manuscript deadline
15 February 2023

Cover image - Teachers and Teaching

Special Issue Editor(s)

Ann-Thérèse Arstorp, University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway
[email protected]

Anders D. Olofsson, Umeå University, Sweden
[email protected]

Ola J. Lindberg, Umeå University, Sweden
[email protected]

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Professional Digital Competence in Teacher Education; where are we, where are we headed and how to get there?

About this Special Issue

The past decades have shown an increase in political expectations and concerns regarding the development of students’ digital skills, as they are considered an important skillsets to prepare them for an increasingly uncertain future (Arstorp, 2021; Caena & Redecker, 2019; OECD, 2018; Voogt & Roblin, 2012). Consequently, both in-service teachers in the K-12 school, teacher educators and student teachers in teacher education (TE) need to develop their own digital skills as well as their professional digital competence (PDC) in order to be able to develop the digital skills their students’ (Erstad et al., 2021; Lindfors et al., 2021; Røkenes & Krumsvik, 2014; Tondeur et al., 2018; Uerz et al., 2018). This makes teacher educators important stakeholders in preparing new generations of teachers for teaching in today’s classrooms (Tondeur et al., 2019). Several frameworks have influenced how the educational sector as well as research perceives and implements PDC, such influence has come from different frameworks for 21st century skills (e.g. (ISTE, 2007; Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2002), the TPACK framework (Mishra & Koehler, 2006) and the the DigCompEdu framework in 2017 by the European Commission (Redecker & Punie, 2017) to name a few. The latter shows an important point here, which is that teacher competences in a European educational context oftentimes is referred to as a combination of skills, knowledge, creativity, and attitudes (Caena & Redecker, 2019; Krumsvik, 2014; Redecker & Punie, 2017). Another European example of such a framework is the Norwegian Professional Digital Competence Framework for Teachers (Kelentrić et al., 2017), where the prefix professional was added to digital competence (Krumsvik, 2011; Tømte, 2013).

Regardless of these policy-driven intentions, current research shows how PDC develops slower than expected (NIFU, 2022; Tondeur et al., 2018), which might be related to the fact that it is rather demanding for TE institutions and for the individual teacher educator to meet these expectations (Ranieri & Bruni, 2018; Tondeur et al., 2018). Previous studies have shown that newly qualified teachers often lack sufficient PDC in order to utilize and critically evaluate digital technology in a pedagogical context (Gudmundsdottir & Hatlevik, 2018, 2020; Tondeur et al., 2018). This has been observed across educational systems in Europe (Enochsson & Rizza, 2009; Kelentrić et al., 2017; Olofsson et al., 2021), which means that a discrepancy exists between the need for digitally competent teachers and what TE in Europe has to offer (Arstorp, 2015; Foulger et al., 2017; Instefjord & Munthe, 2017; Reisoğlu & Çebi, 2020). It also raises questions about the direction of teacher education, as well as what factors influence teacher education and create change. This suggests a need for research on perspectives and developments related to preservice teachers’ development of PDC in European TE (Gudmundsdottir & Hatlevik, 2018; Tømte et al., 2015; Uerz et al., 2018), including the role of policy related to practice for the development of PDC and research inquiring the challenges, issues and obstacles that teacher education is facing and ways to overcome them.

Papers are invited that address areas and topics outlined below but not restricted to:

  • The concept of professional digital competence (PDC) in teacher education (TE) and paths for further conceptual development, also possibly including literature reviews on or meta-analysis of PDC in TE.
  • Showcase ground-breaking research on PDC in teacher education policy in a European context, particularly welcoming comparative studies.
  • Illustrate and add insight into teacher educators’ beliefs of PDC in order to add insight into the complexity of developing PDC in a post-pandemic TE and identifying important implications for future research on the topic.
  • Explore a wide range of topics related to the theme being investigated in this SI (e.g., PDC related to teacher educators’ dual didactical task, teacher educators’ continuous professional development around PDC, the potential challenges of implementing PDC in TE, Future Classroom Labs in TE etc.).

Submission Instructions

Abstract submission deadline: August 30th, 2022

  • Proposal abstracts should be submitted by email attachment to the co-editors Ann-Thérèse Arstorp ([email protected]), Anders D. Olofsson ([email protected]), and J. Ola Lindberg ([email protected]) with “Teachers and teaching. Special Issue” as the subject line.
  • Notification of acceptance/rejection of abstract will be sent by October 1st, 2022. 
  • Please be aware that selection of the proposal abstract does not guarantee publication, as full manuscripts will be subject to double blind peer review.

What information should be included in the abstract proposal?

  • Name of Author(s), affiliation(s) and e-mail address(es).
  • Brief description of the context being targeted, the study and its pertinence/relevance to the special issue.
  • Maximum of 450-500 words including 4-6 keywords.

Regarding the nature of the full paper if the abstract is accepted:

  • Deadline for submission of the full manuscript: February 15th, 2023.
  • 6,000 to 7,000 words inclusive of tables, references and endnotes. See author guidelines for details.
  • Each article will receive at least two independent double-blind reviews.

Publication dates:

  • Manuscripts will undergo up to 2 review cycles. The special issue will be published in November 2023.

Important dates for this special issue:

- August 17, 2022 — abstract submission deadline

- October 1, 2022 — notification of acceptance/rejection. Please be aware that selection of the proposal abstract does not guarantee publication, as full manuscripts will be subject to further editorial assessment and blind review

- February 15, 2023 — first submission of manuscript in the editorial system

- November 2023 – publication of special issue

Contact:

Ann-Thérèse Arstorp ([email protected])

Anders D. Olofsson ([email protected])

Ola J. Lindberg ([email protected])

Instructions for AuthorsSubmit an Article

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