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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies

For a Special Issue on
Teaching Beyond Dread: A Special Issue Dedicated to the Persistence of Teaching

Abstract deadline
20 January 2023

Manuscript deadline
15 June 2023

Cover image - Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies

Special Issue Editor(s)

Alexander J. Means, University of Hawai'i at Manoa
[email protected]

Yuko Ida, University of Hawai'i at Manoa
[email protected]

Matthew Myers, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

Submit an ArticleVisit JournalArticles

Teaching Beyond Dread: A Special Issue Dedicated to the Persistence of Teaching

The focus of this special issue is the meaning and persistence of teaching in a time of dread. David Theo Goldberg suggests that dread is the underlying mood, vibration, and tone of our time. Dread organizes and haunts subjectivity and collective experience. Unlike grief, which is a nameable feeling of loss stemming from a discernible cause, dread is more akin to melancholy, an affective state of being that saturates, afflicts, and floats without name. Dread is embodied and anticipatory. It is the felt destabilization of world, space, and time within late capitalism. This special issue seeks philosophical, theoretical, and personal essays and commentaries that reflect on what it means to teach, and the persistence of teaching, amid an ambient culture of dread.

Widespread speculation of civil war today obscures an ongoing and deeper war against civil society, against history, against memory, against difference, against compassion, and against solidarity. Dreadful symptoms are manifold and include intensified attacks on educators, schools, and universities by finance capital, dark money networks, white nationalists, and neo-fascists. This reflects a war against the very idea of teaching as a pursuit of ideas, care, joy, truth, and justice. What does it mean to teach in a climate of racist dread and homophobic paranoia? What does it mean to teach when educators are perceived as a potential enemy? What does it mean to teach when suicide rates among youth, who are always more attuned to the present, have tripled in the last ten years? What does it mean to teach as land and wealth are increasingly redistributed to the top of class pyramid, while large majorities see their lives and futures becoming more unstable and insecure? What does it mean to teach when studies by the world’s leading scientists warn that the we are close to irreversible climate breakdown? What does it mean to teach when superstorms, mega draughts, wildfires, loss of biodiversity, and species extinction proliferate and therein expose growing asymmetries of responsibility and vulnerability across communities?

Crucially, the special issue seeks contributions that reflect not only on these contours of dread, but on the persistence of teaching. How does teaching endure despite dread? How does teaching persist and what is the role of teaching in a moment where the old world is dying and the new one we need has yet to be born? How does teaching remain vital against historical amnesia and the pernicious myth that solidarity is either a pathology, or a dangerous fantasy? How might teaching be retained and rethought as a creative force for imagination over fatalism, reciprocity over exploitation, thought over fundamentalism, belonging over atomization, love over nihilism, mutuality over narcissism, care over hatred, joy over despair, democracy over fascism, and hope over dread? How does teaching enact the future? What new stories of teaching might be told?

Submission Instructions

The special issue invites substantive (interdisciplinary) contributions (3,000-6,000 word essays, commentaries, reflections, and critical research studies) exploring the above questions. We are particularly keen on work that mobilizes innovative theoretical perspectives to reflect on material, aesthetic, and embodied realities of teaching and teacher work within/beyond the culture of dread.

Submissions should use APA style citations and references.

Please submit abstracts (300-500 words) with brief author bio or inquiries with the subject heading “REPCS Special Issue Proposal” by January 20, 2023 to: to Yuko Ida: [email protected]

Anticipated timeline (Fall 2023 publication):

Abstracts due: January 20, 2023

Invitations to submit manuscript: February 1, 2023

Manuscripts drafts due: June 15, 2023

Reviews complete: August 15, 2023

Final drafts due: October 1, 2023

Published online: November 1, 2023

Instructions for AuthorsSubmit an Article

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