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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Journal of Educational Administration and History

For a Special Issue on
The implications of the #metoo movement on educational institutions, educational leadership and policy

Abstract deadline
26 April 2022

Manuscript deadline
28 November 2022

Cover image - Journal of Educational Administration and History

Special Issue Editor(s)

Jane Wilkinson, Faculty of Education, Monash University
[email protected]

Amanda Keddie, Research for Educational Impact Strategic Research Centre, School of Education, Deakin University
[email protected]

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The implications of the #metoo movement on educational institutions, educational leadership and policy

Recently a young Australian, Chanel Contos asked her Instagram followers if they had been sexually abused whilst at school age. As a result of an overwhelming response, she created a petition asking Australian women to anonymously share their experiences and demand holistic consent education in schools. At the time of writing, the petition had received 44,715 signatures and 6,756 often harrowing testimonies of sexual abuse. A silence had been broken.

In a range of nations, the #metoo movement has fuelled intense public and political interest in sexual harassment and abuse. This interest has led to renewed scrutiny on these issues in schools and, in particular, what schools are doing to address gender-based violence and gender injustice. While educational institutions have long grappled with these issues and they have long (although intermittently) been the focus of educational policy, the current climate is raising new uncomfortable and challenging questions for educational leaders, systems and policy makers. This is a climate of unprecedented volatility in relation to gender politics where a proliferation of vocal feminist movements have been met with virulent and sometimes violent backlash politics as in movements such as #himtoo, the INCELs and other men’s rights groups. In this climate, there are calls for schools to do more but the difficulty of this task tends not to be fully recognised. Political and system responses to instate better consent education are a band aid over the broader questions the movement raises. These issues include but are not limited to the role educational institutions, educators and administrators continue to play in perpetuating or challenging societal attitudes to gender-based violence and misogyny. It also includes how these forms of gendered violence continue to be compounded by intersecting relations of sexual diversity, ethnicity, ‘race’, class and able-bodiedness and through particular spaces and places.

Started in 2006 by activist Tarana Burke and reaching a critical point in the public consciousness in 2017, the #metoo movement has provided a vital platform for speaking truth to power and for building a community of survivors and supporters. This special issue turns a lens towards education and educational leadership.

Questions to be addressed within this special issue include (but are not limited to):

  • What theoretical and socially critical resources can be drawn on to tease out the implications of the #metoo movement for educational institutions, educational leadership and policy making?
  • How might historical lenses shed light on and provide salient implications for contemporary educating, leadership and policy responses to the movement, including productive ways forward?
  • What are the implications of the movement for educational leaders and administrators in terms of practice and policy?
  • How are the implications of the movement for educational institutions and leadership playing out in diverse ethnic and/or cultural contexts? What can we learn from these diverse moves?
  • What policy initiatives could be put in place to address the educational challenges brought about by the #metoo movement?

Contributions that employ intersectional/historical and/or socially critical lenses are particularly welcome. We are especially keen to gain a range of perspectives from across the globe and within varied educational settings.

The Journal of Educational Administration and History (JEAH) publishes work that takes a critical perspective on issues relating to educational administration, leadership and policy. Its mission is to incorporate historical perspectives to help us examine these issues within their wider historical and social contexts.

Submission Instructions

Please refer to JEAH’s aims and scope before crafting a submission

Submit an abstract of 400 words (excluding references) to the special issue editors, Jane Wilkinson ([email protected]) and Amanda Keddie ([email protected].au)

Abstracts should clearly include how the journal’s scope of historicising current issues will be addressed in the paper

Please clearly indicate the theoretical lens to be employed within the paper

  • Abstract Submissions – Tuesday 26 April 2022
  • Invitation to submit – Monday 23 May 2022
  • First draft due – Monday 28 November 2022 (please select "The implications of the #metoo movement on educational institutions, educational leadership and policy" special issue when submitting your paper to Scholar One)
  • Production / Publication Estimated – July 2023

Instructions for AuthorsSubmit an Article

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