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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management

For a Special Issue on
Beyond equity and inclusion policy – student achievement at and after university

Abstract deadline
31 March 2022

Manuscript deadline
15 August 2022

Cover image - Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management

Special Issue Editor(s)

Professor Denise Jackson, Edith Cowan University, Australia
[email protected]

Dr Ian Li, The University of Western Australia, Australia
[email protected]

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Beyond equity and inclusion policy – student achievement at and after university

This special issue of the JHEPM will explore how different groups of students perform at university and the implications for higher education policy and practice.

We recognise the expansionary policies and strategies on widening participation in the higher education sector which, in many countries worldwide, have led to evidenced increases in enrolments among ‘non-traditional’ students (including, but not limited to, those who do not enter directly from secondary education). In many places, the introduction of diverse pathways into university – such as vocational education, preparation courses and access programs – has meant greater representation among students from certain equity groups.

This special issue intends to develop our understanding of the performance and experiences of these students once they arrive at university, and in relation to their more traditional peers. We wish to consider performance in the broadest sense, welcoming insights on traditional measures such as retention, course completion and academic achievements, and beyond.

We are also keen to extend our focus beyond commonly identified equity groups (students who are from regional or remote areas; who identify as Indigenous; are of low socioeconomic status; have a disability; are from non-English speaking backgrounds; or are females from non-traditional areas of study, including STEM), embracing studies that explore inclusivity and student performance at university. Such studies might explore the experience and outcomes of students in relation to characteristics such as sexual orientation, gender identity, neuro-diversity, culture, and religion.

Papers are sought from different perspectives and disciplines, involving empirical analysis, rather than conceptual models. International studies are welcome. We welcome studies with a qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-method research design. Papers could address (but are not limited to) the following questions:

  • Does students’ performance differ based on their entry pathway and equity group status?
  • Do different aspects of students’ experience differ based on their entry pathway and equity group status?
  • What role does a student’s sexual orientation or gender identity play in their experience and outcomes at university?
  • Does cultural background influence the student experience and performance outcomes at university?
  • Does the experience of marginalised groups at university affect their employability?
  • How can policy on equity and inclusion enhance students’ experience and outcomes at university?
  • How should higher education policy better support certain student groups to enhance performance and outcomes during university?
  • How should higher education be shaping practice to encourage greater equity and inclusion in the transition to work?
  • Which groups are marginalised and perform less well at university, and why?

Answering these questions would assist higher education management and educators in developing policy and practice that more effectively engages, and develops non-traditional students, empowering them to better succeed in higher education and beyond.

About the Special Issue Editors

Professor Denise Jackson is the Director of Work-Integrated Learning in the School of Business and Law at Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia. Denise is focused on preparing students for future work and career through embedding meaningful industry and community engagement into the curriculum, as well as providing access to a range of employability-related activities. She has published widely in the areas of graduate employment, employability, career development learning, student transition to the workplace and work-integrated learning. Denise’s work has been recognised by several research and teaching and learning awards, most recently a national Award for Teaching Excellence and the James W. Wilson Award for Outstanding Contribution to Research in the Field of Cooperative Education. Denise is a National Director for the Australian Collaborative Education Network (ACEN), the professional association for WIL in Australia, and serves on numerous editorial boards for journals in higher education.

Dr Ian Li is senior lecturer in health and labour economics and Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, and based at the School of Population and Global Health in The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Ian leads the health economics discipline and teaching for the health policy and economics courses at the School, and is a member of the University’s Academic Board and Equity and Participation Working Group. His teaching has been recognised by several teaching awards, including a national award for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching awarded by the Council of Academic Public Health Institutions Australasia. Ian’s research interests include the areas of higher education policy and equity, graduate outcomes, and determinants of well-being, with a track record of high quality competitive grants and publications in those areas. Ian is an editorial board member of the Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, and co-edits the Australian Journal of Labour Economics. Ian is a Research Fellow of the IZA Institute of Labor, University of Bonn, and has been a visiting scholar at Harvard University, Swansea University and the University of Melbourne.

Submission Instructions

Between five and eight abstracts will be selected for development into an article for the special issue. Papers can be up to 5,000 words in length, excluding references, tables and appendices. Final acceptance of manuscripts will be subject to peer review. The guest editors can provide support to shortlisted authors to develop their paper if required but only manuscripts of publishable quality will be included in the special issue.

Please send your abstract as a PDF or Word document to [email protected] by 31 March 2022. Include:

  • the name and institution of the corresponding author;
  • names and institutions of other authors;
  • email address for the corresponding author;
  • draft title for the article; and
  • a draft abstract of up to 500 words.

Timeframe

  • Abstract submission* (up to 500 words): by 31 March 2022
  • Notification of acceptance: no later than 30 April 2022
  • Submission of full paper for review: by 15 August 2022
  • Submission of final papers: by 30 November 2022
  • Likely Publication Issue: April 2023

If you have any queries regarding this Special Issue, please contact the Special Issues Editor, Dr Maddy McMaster, at [email protected].

Instructions for AuthorsSubmit an Article

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