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Manuscript deadline
01 August 2020

Cover image - Human Resource Development International

Human Resource Development International

Special Issue Editor(s)

Brad Shuck, University of Louisville, United States of America
[email protected]

Woocheol Kim, Korea University of Technology and Education, South Korea

Luke Fletcher, Aston University, United Kingdom

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Engagement at 30: A Retrospective and Look Forward through an International Cross-Cultural Context

Human Resource Development International Call for Special Issue Engagement at 30: A Retrospective and Look Forward through an International Cross-Cultural Context

 

GUEST EDITORS

  • Dr. Woocheol Kim, Korea University of Technology and Education, South Korea
  • Dr. Luke Fletcher, Aston University, United Kingdom
  • Dr. Brad Shuck, University of Louisville, United States of America ([email protected])

 

SPECIAL ISSUE PROPOSAL

Over the last thirty years, engagement, in its many forms – work, job, employee, and/or organisational – has received unprecedented and rising attention across the globe. In early 1990, William Kahn published his seminal research on personal engagement and disengagement. Post 1990, scholars around the world have matured the concept of engagement into a growing field of study to include many perspectives, applications, and ideas. This body of growing work includes research by social scientists across a myriad of disciplines such as large-scale reviews, empirical application, theory building, and conceptual positioning, to name just a few.

The voluminous record of scholarship of engagement grows by the day. As the construct of engagement turns 30, we wonder what could be next. Traditionally, engagement has been applied through Western-centric ideology yet work in Eastern-oriented and Central and South America contexts are pushing the boundaries of what we know about the experiences of engagement. New ways of work are developing as the knowledge economy unfolds and technology rapidly redefines the boundaries of work, the workplace, and the working experience. More, engagement has, in many ways been viewed through a predominately positivistic framework, where scientific evidence and precision has driven what we think engagement is; quantifying engagement to better capture it has been the goal. Yet, research tells us at that times, engagement is about the experience and the phenomenon; like a vapor in the wind that appears for a while, and then vanishes. There is more to know and understand. Across cultures, context, and nationalities, engagement could represent different ideologies and ways of doing research and business that we have not yet uncovered.

This Special Issue (SI) aims to cover the wide breadth of perspectives and viewpoints and to explore engagement from a multi-perspective, multi-cultural, and/or multi-contextual perspective. The purpose of this HRDI SI is to explore the most emerging ideas and applications of engagement linked states across the globe. We invite scholars from fields both inside and outside of HRD and HR to explore how engagement has been applied in varying international and cross-cultural contexts.

SUGGESTED THEMES FOR SPECIAL ISSUE

We are excited to address the application of engagement – whether employee, work, job, or organizational – across cultural contexts and we encourage situating engagement within cultural boundaries that remain underrepresented throughout the world, such as developing and emerging economies, identities, and professions.

WE WELCOME CONTRIBUTING PAPERS THAT ARE:

  • Grounded in evidence, including research studies and workplace case-studies (qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method); and/or
  • Theoretical or conceptual papers that make meaning of the existing literature in novel ways; and/or
  • Thought leader pieces that align with, or challenge, the status quo of engagement.

SPECIFIC AREAS, QUESTIONS, AND IDEAS OF ENCOURAGED DEVELOPMENT INCLUDE:

  • How do engagement experiences/practices connect with issues of diversity and inclusion?
  • How ‘does’ engagement, i.e. a set of engagement practices, link with the psychological experience of engagement. For example, what mechanisms explain how implementing engagement related practices can enhance the overall psychological experience of engagement and what contextual conditions may prevent or strengthen these processes?
  • How do multinational/global companies tailor their approach to engagement across countries they operate in and why they might do this, and how? Is there any evidence of this?
  • What variation is there in the phemenological experience or meaning of engagement across cultures/national contexts, especially in developing countries and economies?
  • How are consultancies changing their discourse around engagement since the emergence of critical academic debate and evidence? Is engagement still relevant in their practice, or has it moved on/morphed with other concepts? How have they incorporated the evolving evidence base?
  • What socio-political events may be shaping the ways engagement is examined/experienced/practiced within particular contexts? • What role does HRD/learning and development functions have in influencing engagement strategy and practice?
  • How has, and how will, engagement need to change and shift as the nature of work evolves, and what new evidence of emerging areas can we better understand?
  • How has engagement developed outside of the prevailing conceptualizations and/or emerging in new economies of scale, countries, and cultures?
  • Where is engagement forgotten, or silent, and how has that impacted overall practice? What evidence do we have to shape future conversations? We are not asking authors to adhere to a specific framework of employee engagement or school of thought; however, authors are strongly encouraged to provide support for their theoretical/conceptual framework and to use the existing literature in HRD, when reasonable, to ground their work. Papers that provide a justification for their theoretical/conceptual framework, methodology (as applicable), and grounded implications practice will be more likely to be favourably reviewed by the SI Team.

 

TIMELINE FOR SUBMISSION

  • August 1st, 2020- Full complete papers due to HRDI for Special Issue. All submissions to be submitted through https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rhrd20/current. Select Special Issue option in submission management system.
  • September 1st, 2020 | Selection complete on manuscripts for SI; authors to be notified by Editor Team
  • January 15th, 2021 | Resubmission of articles and peer reviewer process through HRDI
  • October 1st, 2021 | Issue finalized and completed All contributions must have a specific cultural or global perspective and be broadly grounded within the field of HRD. For questions, please contact Dr. Brad Shuck.

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Submission Instructions

Special Issue Title: Engagement at 30: A Retrospective and Look Forward through an International Cross-Cultural Context WE WELCOME CONTRIBUTING PAPERS THAT ARE: • Grounded in evidence, including research studies and workplace case-studies (qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method); and/or • Theoretical or conceptual papers that make meaning of the existing literature in novel ways; and/or • Thought leader pieces that align with, or challenge, the status quo of engagement. Expected publication date: November 2021

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