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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Digital Creativity

For a Special Issue on
Ubimus Contributions to Digital Creative Practices

Manuscript deadline
10 April 2023

Cover image - Digital Creativity

Special Issue Editor(s)

Damián Keller, NAP, Federal University of Acre
[email protected]

Victor Lazzarini, Maynooth University
[email protected]

Luca Turchet, University of Trento
[email protected]

Anthony Lewis Brooks, Aalborg University
[email protected]

Submit an ArticleVisit JournalArticles

Ubimus Contributions to Digital Creative Practices

Ubiquitous music (ubimus) research encompasses sonic creative endeavors that deal with the emerging convergence of technologies with artistic, educational and community-oriented practices. This special issue targets discussing the impact of the pandemic and how post-pandemic ubimus will be approached. This includes changes in creative practices beyond technical aspects while exploring the links between ubimus and human well-being and health. Well-being and human development have been central preoccupations of the ubimus field since its first decade of existence. Music making provides a channel for socialization with an excellent potential for therapeutic purposes. New support strategies could involve both new designs of digital creative resources and the extant audio, haptic and multimodal infrastructure. Given the restrictions on physical contact imposed by the Covid-19 pandemic, ubimus approaches to distant socializing and collective artistic activities may furnish innovative ways to boost social bonding. How could ubimus creative practices help to temper the impact of reduced physical contact? How could ubimus activities strengthen the force of social bonds and individual well-being?

Other emerging threads are the integration of the Internet of Things, new interfaces for musical expression, networked music performance, music information retrieval, human-computer interaction, and participatory art. They open infrastructure that enables an ecosystem of interoperable devices that connect musicians with each other, as well as with audiences. This fosters the interaction between performers, composers, conductors, studio producers, sound engineers, and audience members, whether in co-located or remote settings. How can networks, interfaces, data be employed for creative practices in ubimus? What are the limitations and advantages of this infrastructure in domestic settings? How could these lead to  musical deployments beyond the traditional artistic venues?

For this Digital Creativity special issue, we invite submissions that address these, as well as related, questions for the field of ubiquitous music.

Topics of interest include with in the field of ubiquitous music:

  • Computational thinking
  • Ecological thinking
  • Ubimus and everyday musical creativity
  • Ubimus and lay-musician interaction
  • Domestic music production
  • Digital creativity and the Internet of Musical Things
  • Gastrosonics (taste, texture, smell and sound)
  • Smart Musical Instruments and their creative applications
  • Human development and well-being

Submission Instructions

Authors interested in contributing are invited to submit full length papers (up to 7000 words).

Please include "Special Issue 34:4"  in the title of your submitted paper. Assuming fit with the special issue topic, full papers will then be double-anonymous peer reviewed for acceptance into the special issue. Once you submit your manuscript to Digital Creativity’s Submission Portal, please email guest editors (as well as editors of Digital Creativity) with submission information: <[email protected]> and <[email protected]>.

Expected publication: late 2023

Instructions for AuthorsSubmit an Article

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