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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education

For a Special Issue on
Honouring Indigenous Knowledges in Research and Education: Frameworks and practice

Abstract deadline
31 August 2022

Manuscript deadline
31 December 2022

Cover image - Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education

Special Issue Editor(s)

lisahunter, Monash University
[email protected]

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Honouring Indigenous Knowledges in Research and Education: Frameworks and practice

This Special Issue, focussing on Honouring Indigenous Knowledge (SI HIK), is facilitated on Boonwurrung/Bunurong Country and processed via the journal home on Wadawurrung Country. On behalf of all contributors and users of SI HIK I acknowledge these lands have never been ceded and our privileges have come at a cost to our First Nations peoples. I pay my respects to their contemporary Elders and families, and their ancestors, who have cared for the lands, waters and skies, as custodians and with wisdoms embodied -being the oldest living continuous human culture on the planet. Their land, ‘Always was and always will be’.

This SI builds on a 2019 commitment by members of the national Australian Association for Research in Education HPE Special Interest Group (AARE HPE SIG) and the 2021 International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP) field, to continue to engage in complicated conversations around honouring Indigenous ways of knowing/being/doing, as Indigenous and non-Indigenous collaborations, and through HPE, teacher education, sport and physical activity settings. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP, 2007) acknowledges that the fundamental and foundational human rights of Indigenous peoples can be categorised into four key principles:

  • self-determination.
  • participation in decision-making.
  • respect for and protection of culture.
  • equality and non-discrimination.

Honouring such principles is a multifaceted undertaking given the diversity of Indigenous Peoples across the world and some of the historical violence that has ignored or erased Indigenous Peoples and their sovereignty (Moreton-Robinson, 2015), including through academic work (Smith & Smith, 2021), and reconciling Indigenous knowledge in education (Battiste, 2018). After Kame’eleihiwa (1992), and many others since, we also accept that one of the not unproblematized factors binding the network of Indigenous Peoples globally is their connection to a long relationship with time and place and colonization. Theirs is a worldview contrasted ethic-onto-epistemologically with dominant Western societies where HPE/HPETE is operating. Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars working in HPE/HPETE, and their corresponding professional organisations and affiliations, are invited to submit theoretical and empirical work where they are approaching an UNDRIP principle/s, acknowledging and developing Indigenous ways of knowing/being/doing that are contextual to the places they reside, and/or into their teaching, programming, and research. Submissions might focus on, but not be limited to, how they are conceptualizing Indigenous ways of knowing/being/doing; the obstacles and opportunities they have experienced in attempting to (re)indigenize and decentre whiteness; share distinct, plural and complex ways that Indigenous ways of knowing are conceptualized in local/global contexts; or the affinities that exist across borderlands in attempting to incorporate Indigenous ways of knowing and decentre whiteness.

From Indigenous scholars we also invite contributions that sit outside western-scientific worldviews.

The Honouring Indigenous Knowledge Special Issue is planned as a 2023 publication.

Submission Instructions

EOIs for contributions should include the following information:

  1. A working title.
  2. 150 word maximum abstract.
  3. Author details (names and affiliations of all proposed contributors, email for corresponding author).
  4. Proposed submission date that will work for you.

Based on advice by two Indigenous led expert groups and underlined by UNDRIP (2007), all submissions should also include:

  • a brief statement (100 words):
    • of author/s positioning announcing who they are, where they are from, and why they are doing the research/submission;
    • a critical reflection on author/s place as an insider/outsider researcher within Indigenous Studies;
    • consideration of how your submission adheres (or may not have) to UNDRIP principles, key locally relevant Indigenous; Research Protocols, Cultural Safety, and Indigenous Ethical guidelines; and,
    • show consideration of how the proposed manuscript can be linked to an aspect of ‘curriculum’ (see Journal Aims and Scope)

EOIs should be submitted by 31st August 2022 to Guest Editor lisahunter - [email protected] with subject line ‘SI HIK EOI’.

SI HIK will comprise of six (6) manuscripts of approximately 6,500 words including references, with an abstract of up to 150 words (see author guidelines).

Indigenous authors wanting to contribute to the theme but outside normative western-scientific ethic-ontoepistemologies are welcome to negotiate possible contributions with the Special Issue Guest Editor lisahunter. For further enquires contact [email protected]

Instructions for AuthorsSubmit an Article

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