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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Critical Studies in Media Communication

For a Special Issue on
Lifting as We Climb: Elevating Mediated Epistemologies by and about Black Women

Manuscript deadline
02 December 2022

Cover image - Critical Studies in Media Communication

Special Issue Editor(s)

Rachel Alicia Griffin, PhD, University of Utah
[email protected]

Kimberly R. Moffitt, PhD, University of Maryland Baltimore County
[email protected]

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Lifting as We Climb: Elevating Mediated Epistemologies by and about Black Women

As CSMC’s first Black women Editors, one of the ways we will “lift as we climb” is by reserving Special Issue space for theorizations of Black transgender, queer, and cisgender women and media. In so doing, we are marshalling the overlap between our respective research profiles and responding to calls from within our discipline for NCA’s journals to more consistently attend to inclusion, diversity, equity, and access (IDEA).

Anchoring our editorial praxis in IDEA and focusing one of our Special Issues on a historically disenfranchised community to which we owe much and belong reflect additional steps toward NCA’s journals intentionally becoming far more equitable.

We envision this Special Issue as an intellectually rigorous space in which diverse authors unapologetically center Black women and media to disrupt the hegemonic practices that often position Black transgender, queer, and cisgender women on the margins of scholarly inquiry—if we are included at all. Moreover, to date, media scholarship that centers Black nonbinary identity is acutely undertheorized. Meeting the politics of underrepresentation with a discourse of refusal, this Special Issue will challenge normative practices and exclusionary structures (e.g., impositions of hyper(in)visibility, oversimplified and caricatured representations, grievous citational politics) by featuring multiple, overlapping, and contradictory voices across the discipline to theorize the state of Black women, Black girls, Black nonbinary identity, and media.

We are especially interested in scholarship on:

  • epistemologies of Black women as auteurs, showrunners, content creators, influencers, gamers, and internet sleuths
  • audience-centered approaches to how Black women experience and use media (e.g., focus groups, interviews, autoethnography, fandom, etc.)
  • the international significance of algorithmic oppression, digital tracing, and social media as a tool of surveillance capitalism in the lives of Black women
  • the shifting landscape of representational politics that showrunners, Black women actors, and/or Black women or nonbinary characters are navigating betwixt/between cultural forces of visibility, invisibility, and hyper(in)visibility
  • portrayals of Black women in interpersonal/family/health/technoscience/military contexts
  • the impact of political ideology and government structures (e.g., neoliberalism, heteropatriarchy, racial capitalism, globalization, etc.) on the mediated stories being told about and/or by Black women
  • the political economy of the industry (e.g., norms, profits, practices, violence, scandals, etc.) that shapes the mediated landscape upon which Black women and Black nonbinary people resist, agitate, and negotiate place and space
  • historical media texts and narratives that are newly significant (e.g., geopolitics, African diaspora, Black resistance movements, cultural imperialism, etc.)
  • links between representational politics and real-world phenomena (e.g., protests, war, parenting, abortion, inflation, capitalism, globalization, etc.)
  • the use of Black women and Black nonbinary people as vehicles for reproducing dominant logics (e.g., imperialism, ethnocentrism, transphobia, heterosexism, patriarchy, classism, ableism, etc.)
  • undertheorized intersections, contexts, and iterations of Black femininity spanning girlhood, adolescence, adulthood, and elders
  • mediated and/or real-world linkages between Black women and other intersectional marginalized communities (e.g., queer, differently abled, working-class, Latinx, SWANA, Asian, Indigenous, etc.)

Review Process

In keeping with the journal’s current practice, submissions will undergo rigorous peer review, including screening by the Editors and review by at least two anonymous referees.

Submission Instructions

Manuscripts should be prepared in Microsoft Word using a 12-point common font, double-spaced, and no more than 7,000 words (including references/tables/etc.).

Manuscripts should adhere to APA 7th edition. Please refer to and follow the journal’s manuscript preparation instructions for authors: https://nca.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=RCSM.

Authors should identify which Special Issue call their submission is responding to by selecting the relevant drop-down option (“Lifting as We Climb”).

Instructions for AuthorsSubmit an Article

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