We use cookies to improve your website experience. To learn about our use of cookies and how you can manage your cookie settings, please see our Cookie Policy. By closing this message, you are consenting to our use of cookies.

Submit a Manuscript to the Journal
Clinical Gerontologist

For a Special Issue on
Migration and Displacement in the Decade of Healthy Ageing: Mental Health Sequelae and Potential Interventions

Manuscript deadline
15 March 2023

Cover image - Clinical Gerontologist

Special Issue Editor(s)

Nancy A. Pachana, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland
[email protected]

Shuang Liu, School of Communication and Arts, The University of Queensland
[email protected]

Submit an ArticleVisit JournalArticles

Migration and Displacement in the Decade of Healthy Ageing: Mental Health Sequelae and Potential Interventions

Globally, older adults face many challenges but perhaps none so daunting as migration and displacement, particularly when this is involuntary and/or a result of military conflict or political upheaval. Such forced displacement includes refugees and asylum seekers, among others. According to the United Nations, as of June 2018, 70.4 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict and generalized violence. These numbers include 20.2 million refugees (a figure exceeding 20 million for the first time), 3.2 million asylum seekers and 39.7 million internally displaced persons (IDPs). The total number of displaced persons has grown to 82.4 million by the end of 2020 (UNHCR, 2020). While the full impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on wider cross-border migration and displacement globally is not yet clear, UNHCR data shows that displacement has continued to grow, and as a result, one in 95 people globally is now forcibly displaced, compared with one in 159 in 2010. Many refugees suffer from distress, anxiety, or mental illness after arrival in the destination country. The loss of social networks, separation from family members, lack of language proficiency of the settlement country, trauma, fear of repatriation, political environment in the home country, among other factors, all play a role in perpetuate psychiatric symptoms, particularly depression.

Older persons face particular risks as a result of migration or displacement, due to health and mental health conditions, disabilities or caregiving responsibilities for family members, or due to contextual issues in the new place of settlement. Older persons may also face heightened risk of human rights abuses, including violence, exploitation, abuse, and other traumatic experiences in these new contexts. It is essential to recognize that older persons have important roles to play in displaced communities, including in preserving cultural heritage and connection with countries of origin. However, response to migration and displacement often focus solely on vulnerability, without adequate acknowledgement of the older person’s capabilities, resilience and potential for participation in decision-making and helping with the settlement process.

With these issues in mind, this special issue focuses on the topics of migration and displacement of older persons, with an emphasis on mental health. We invite submissions which may include:

  • Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods
  • Reviews, original research, and clinical studies
  • Assessment, intervention, and descriptive studies

Submissions must have relevance to mental health providers across a range of settings; clinical implications of the work are required in all manuscripts.

We use cookies to improve your website experience. To learn about our use of cookies and how you can manage your cookie settings, please see our Cookie Policy. By closing this message, you are consenting to our use of cookies.