Routledge Supports the Arts- Behind the Scenes Interview 2 - Campaign Page Builder

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Routledge Supports the Arts & Humanities: Behind the Scenes Interview 2

Meet Routledge Journals Portfolio Manager: Geraldine Richards

Routledge is the world's leading academic publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences. We publish thousands of books and journals each year, serving scholars, instructors, and professional communities worldwide. In honor of Arts & Humanities Month, we wanted to take a moment to highlight some of the people who work behind the scenes in bringing this important research to the public.

Please meet: Geraldine Richards. 

Introduce yourself: what is your role with Routledge, Taylor & Francis? 

GR: I’m Geraldine Richards and I’m a Portfolio Manager for Art & Design and History journals. I work on titles such as The Art Bulletin, Public Art Dialogue, and Digital Creativity.

How did you get involved in working with the arts?

GR: I got lucky! I love art and design—studying art and representation through my Africana studies major in college. I had a few twists and turns that led me to publishing and I’ve been working in humanities publishing ever since, with a major emphasis on the arts. I was open to what kind of publishing I would do and I am really fortunate that I get to work in the field and focus on personal interests.

Why is working in the arts important to you?

GR: Some form of art is in everything I love. I couldn’t imagine not working with art or in the arts. I find art in museums, yes, but also on the street (Philadelphia has great public art), through physical movement, and in history—my other subject focus, for example.

How does your role directly correlate to having an impact within the arts?

GR: In my role with journals I manage relationships with societies, editors and authors that are publishing within art and design. I advocate for arts publishing, and humanities overall, to colleagues in other subject areas and departments. Also, I advocate for the publications I work on to the larger public, both in person at conferences and online through social media discussion and promotion.

How do you art?

GR: I celebrate it every chance I get. I travel a fair amount and try to go to a museum in every city I go to. I think I got lucky on a recent trip to London coinciding with Kara Walker’s latest commission, Fons Americanus, at the Tate Modern. Kara Walker is one of my personal favorite artists. There was also Yinka Shonibare’s British Library piece on display. I’m drawn to this piece for the art and history being discussed. Being US born, but from immigrant parents from a formerly colonized island, I’m drawn heavily to both artists. I might not “understand” everything I see so I appreciate talking to researchers in the field and learning from them. Fun fact, the Shonibare piece was discussed and used as the cover image for Wasafiri 32(1) from 2017.

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Thousands of books covered in batik Dutch fabric with names of notable British people called: The British Library by Yinka Shonibare

Thousands of books covered in batik Dutch fabric with names of notable British people called: The British Library by Yinka Shonibare. The work showcases the ideas supporting open borders, freedom of speech, educational rights, and blended heritage.