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Interview with Tibor Fülöp, new Editor-in-Chief of Renal Failure

Editor Q&A: Tibor Fülöp, Editor-in-Chief of Renal Failure

We took the time to interview the new Editor-in-Chief of Renal FailureTibor Fülöp, to discuss his background, experience, and what he sees to be the future of the journal.

Tibor is current Editor-in-Chief of the open access journal Renal Failure, and core faculty member of the Nephrology Division of the Medical University of South Carolina, USA.

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Q: Tell us a little about your academic and professional background before becoming Editor-in-Chief of Renal Failure.

A: I am a 1990 alumnus of the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary, graduating “summa cum laude” from the Faculty of General Medicine. Most of my clinical training was completed in the United States. For about 4 years I also worked as a primary care physician after finishing my Nephrology training.

The largest part of my professional academic career was accomplished at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, where I was hired as a new faculty in 2003 and worked with a large number of very talented colleagues and mentors, rising through the ranks to Full Professor with Tenure at the end of 2015. I have also worked outside the United States for brief periods, serving on the faculty of outstanding institutions, including the Semmelweis University and University of Debrecen in Hungary.

I am currently a core faculty member of the Nephrology Division for Medical University in South Carolina. I am kept busy seeing patients and working with trainees in a large and vibrant Nephrology Fellowship program. My immediate clinical interests include Intensive Care Unit nephrology, home-based renal replacement therapies, renal vasculitis and, perhaps strangely, medical prevention of kidney stones.

Q: What attracted you to the role of Editor-in-Chief of Renal Failure?

A: First and foremost, I view this as an opportunity to make quality academic publishing possible for young and talented authors from all over the world.

The challenge for me in my role is to make Renal Failure an even a better journal and to assist authors to help them publish better papers. This experience is unlike any I have had before, being responsible for navigating 50+ papers through peer review at any given time!

"I view this as an opportunity to make quality academic publishing possible for young and talented authors from all over the world."

 

Q: What do you think is the main aim of Renal Failure? What are you hoping to achieve in your post as Editor-in-Chief?

A: We are hoping for continued growth in the number of publications this year, with an actively engaged Editorial Board working to make peer review a better experience where all parties learn from each other and have the professional satisfaction of intellectual exchange.

I think we also have a wonderful opportunity to learn from colleagues who work in less resource-rich environments.

"We have a wonderful opportunity to learn from colleagues who work in less resource-rich environments."

Q: What kinds of research are you looking forward to publishing? Which research topics do you think are of particular interest to the research community at the current time?

A: In the recent years, the main focus of Renal Failure was acute kidney injury: both basic sciences studies and those derived from human studies on the subjects. I think this trend will continue: the clinical need exists to support the drive for research. The high mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the critically ill is unacceptable and maintaining the status quo is clearly not an option. First of all, I think we start admitting that we have failed to improve outcomes of AKI in the critically ill sufficiently.

I also think we need to consider a different approach to publishing reviews. Currently, this is a very unorganized process and our journal – like many others - will receive papers in a somewhat random manner. Perhaps we should think about this differently and put out a list of ideas we would like to invite reviews on… I hope to rely on our Editorial Board members to collect the worthiest ideas.

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Q: Renal Failure is an open access publication. How do you think open access impacts your authors?

A: Renal Failure is fortunate in having a long history and strong track record of publications. Unlike many worthy attempts for starting a new journal, we are truly privileged to be hitting the ground running with a firm and reputable journal and established relationships with a number of talented reviewers and authors.

Whether we like it or not, I think open access (OA) is here to stay; the very success of journals like PLoS One and Scientific Reports tells us as much. There is no doubt in my mind that OA will continue to grow into the future.

I do, however, recognize the costs associated with open access publication. Nonetheless, open access offers unimpeded visibility of research all over the word. As authors, we already put a tremendous amount of time and effort into our papers before we even receive the acceptance note. It only fair to our work - if we truly believe the significance of our findings - to enable our projects to gain world-wide visibility.

 

 

 

"Whether we like it or not, I think open access is here to stay [...]

Open access offers unimpeded visibility of research all over the world. It is only fair to our work - if we truly believe the significance of our findings - to enable our projects to gain world-wide visibility."

Q: Why do you think researchers should consider publishing in Renal Failure over other journals in the field?

A: Renal Failure has a supportive staff and an easy, format-free submission process minimizing the hassle for the corresponding authors. Unlike some of the “mega-journals” of open access, our journal still has a sufficiently narrow profile that a Nephrologist can easily assess the quality of incoming papers and match them with appropriate peer reviewers.

We also have an open-minded Editorial Board who are willing to think outside the box. We will work hard throughout the peer review process to enable each paper to reach its full potential.

"We have a supportive staff and an easy, format-free submission process."

 

Q: What support does Renal Failure offer to authors who submit to the journal?

A: In addition to peer review and Editorial support, Taylor and Francis offer significant APC discounts for authors from countries with limited financial means. Corresponding authors with primary affiliations in countries defined by the World Bank  as ‘Low-Income Economies’ can apply for a 100% article processing change (APC) waiver; those from ‘Lower-Middle Income Economies ’ can apply for a 50% APC discount.

Additionally, those corresponding authors with one of the EIFL (Electronic Information for Libraries) network may be eligible for a 100% or 50% discount as well. Finally, I am happy to share that those serving on our Editorial Board are eligible for a 40% APC discount.

We also provide a robust peer review process to assess the quality of incoming papers and aim for fast times from submission to first decision.

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About Renal Failure

2017 Impact Factor 1.440. Renal Failure is an established and reputable open access journal in the field of Nephrology.
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