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Share your Research.

Upcoming Special Issues

Deadline: 31 December 2019

Now Seeking Research for Volume 25 (2021)

The general editors of EJES are now issuing calls for papers for two issues of the journal to be published in 2021. Potential contributors are invited to submit detailed proposals of up to 800 words to the guest editors of the topic they are interested in. The deadline for proposals for this volume is 31 December 2019.

Procedure

EJES operates in a two-stage review process.

  1. Contributors are invited to submit proposals for essays on the topic in question by 31 December 2019.
  2. Following review of the proposals by the editorial board, informed by external specialists as appropriate, the guest editors will invite the authors of short-listed proposals to submit full-length essays for review with a summer 2020 deadline.
  3. The full-length essays undergo another round of review, and a final selection as well as suggestions for revisions are made. Selected essays are then revised and resubmitted to the guest editors in late 2020 for publication in 2021.

EJES employs Chicago Style (T&F Chicago AD) and British English conventions for spelling and punctuation.

Editorial Information

Journal Editors:
Greta Olson, Institut für Anglistik, University of Giessen, Germany

Isabel Carrera Suárez, University of Oviedo, Spain
Katerina Kitsi-Mitakou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Book Reviews Editor:
Adam Piette, University of Sheffield, UK

 

 

European Journal of English Studies

Feminist Responses to Populist Politics

Guest editors: Mónica Cano Abadía (University of Graz), Sanja Bojanić (University of Rijeka) Adriana Zaharijević (University of Belgrade)

‘Populism’ is as slippery a term as the political soil it rhizomes in. During the last decade, it has been tested in political reality on numerous occasions and with varying outcomes. The distinction between right and left populisms has also become a staple in everyday academic, policy, and civil society discourses. On the left or the right, populisms often act as a bogeyman, as a threat to politics as usual, and as a sure sign that the world is, yet again, out of joint.

But are these misgivings of any substance? Perhaps the world is actually disjointed. It may be that populisms, left or right, fill in the cracks and fissures that have been lain open for only a short period of time, one that coincides with decades of sustained feminist efforts to change the world for the better. Despite the gains, much of what has been won is now being brought to a halt – and it seems that populisms play their share in this stoppage. It is therefore vital to ask what feminist responses to populisms could be. Can the answer to this question be reduced to the issue of political allegiance, or is it a matter of needing to adjust to new political realities? Would this imply then embracing these realities as well? What is the role that populisms now play in shaping the relationship between radical and mainstream feminisms? If we claim that feminism has always been populist to a certain extent, then we have to have a clear notion of the populus at its core. Alternatively, we might categorically posit that feminist populism is a contradiction in terms and therefore also reject the possibility of left populist feminisms.

This special issue addresses feminist visions of politics as a different answer to populisms’ challenges. We wish to mark ambivalences and name conceptual reasons for why it is insufficiently daring or even reactionary to place feminist emancipatory strategies close to politically divisive contemporary tendencies. Instead, we call for a return to notions of feminist resistance and resilience – notions that put an emphasis on agency, change, and hope in the face of the grave challenges we are faced with around the world. The following topics may be addressed:

  • What does ‘feminist populism’ refer to?
  • To what does feminist resistance to populism refer?
  •  How does feminist resilience function?
  • What are the consequences, challenges and possible solutions that feminist resilience can bring about in civil society and institutions?

Detailed proposals (up to 800 words) for full essays (7,500 words), as well as a short biography (max. 100 words) should be sent to all of the editors by 31 December 2019:  Mónica Cano Abadía (monica.cano-abadia@uni-graz.at), Sanja Bojanić (sanja.bojanic@uniri.hr), Adriana Zaharijević (zaharijevic@instifdt.bg.ac.rs)

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Disseminating Knowledge: The Effects of Digitalized Academic Discourse on Language, Genre and Identity

Guest editors: Rosa Lorés Sanz (Universidad de Zaragoza), Giuliana Diani (Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia)

Recent decades have seen a substantial evolution in discursive practices, particularly those associated with institutions, the sciences and the economy. This state of affairs has been enhanced by the appearance of digital platforms, which have made of the web a privileged access platform both for knowledge creation and knowledge dissemination in an increasingly globalized society. This scenario is also characterized by the use of English as the international language of communication, most users being non-native speakers of the language. Thus, the spread of electronic platforms as well as the use of English as a vehicle of international communication have led to the emergence of new discursive practices or the adaptation of existing ones to the digital mode.

Digital affordances, and the immediacy, visibility, and connectedness they bring along, have changed the way we communicate and project our identities. They have also changed the way we approach texts as objects of analysis. This special issue aims to become a forum for some of the latest contributions to this topic. Proposals from different analytical approaches are welcome. These approaches might include computer-mediated discourse analysis, pragmatics, intercultural rhetoric, genre-based analysis, corpus studies or multimodality. The following topics may be addressed:

  • Are digital genres in academic settings modelled on traditional genres in paper format? Or, rather, is the digital mode generating new genres? What are their rhetorical and discursive features?
  • How is identity constructed and represented in digital academic discourse?
  • In which ways has the use of English as a Lingua Franca in the academic world been influenced by the use of digital platforms? To what extent do culture and discipline affect the shaping of academic web-mediated discourse?
  • How do verbal and visual modes interact in academic digital contexts? Which new methods of approaching discourse are needed to understand web-mediated texts?

Detailed proposals (up to 800 words) for full essays (7,500 words), as well as all inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors by 31 December 2019: Rosa Lorés-Sanz (rlores@unizar.es) and Giuliana Diani (giuliana.diani@unimore.it).