The Short List 2019

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The Short List 2019

The Bob Franklin Journal Article Award

About the Prize

The Bob Franklin Journal Article Award, a collaboration between Journalism Studies, Journalism Practice and Digital Journalism, seeks to recognise the article that best contributes to our understanding of “connections between culture and society and journalism practices, journalism studies and/or digital media/new technologies.” One article will be shortlisted by each of the Journals’ Editors from papers published in the annual volume of the journal. The shortlist of three articles will then be evaluated by a panel comprising Bob Franklin and the four key figures from the Journalism Studies field. Articles must be written in the English language.

The Short List 2019

Digital Journalism

YearAuthor(s)JournalArticleVolumeIssue
2018Stefan Baack
Digital JournalismPractically Engaged66

The Digital Journalism Editorial Team nominates this article by Stefan Baack which we found to be an excellent piece of research, and a strong contribution to the field of journalism studies. We base our nomination on three main points. First, the article is a robust and ambitious piece of research, applying mixed methods and using multiple case studies for its empirical basis. This approach is, indeed, rare in journalism studies. Second, it is a study into an increasingly important and timely area of inquiry, namely how journalists interact and coordinate with other actors who are associated with, but not explicitly part of, the journalistic realm. Here, Baack has more specifically unpacked the intersections of these actors as ‘entanglements’ between data journalists and civic technologists, an apt description for the ways the coming together of these types of actors also affects the wider realm of journalistic practice. Third, and in extension of the others, the editorial team finds this article stands out in its success at combining empirical work with theory development. The article thus manages to advance our knowledge of important changes in the digital frontiers, while at the same time building on existing knowledge in journalism studies and about journalism as a space of practice. His conceptual framework will be useful for future research into the boundaries of journalism, journalism practice, and practice theory including how journalistic actors coordinate digital news work with other social actors, and the increasingly ‘entangled’ ways these actors and their practices interact. Read the article here.

Digital Journalism

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Journalism Practice

YearAuthor(s)JournalArticleVolumeIssue
2018Mary Lynn Young, Alfred Hermida & Johanna FuldaJournalism PracticeWhat Makes for Great Data Journalism?121

This excellent article explores what makes great data journalism and is a very useful paper for data journalism scholars, students and journalists. The authors conducted a content analysis on Canadian award winners and found the award winners framed their projects from traditional journalistic standards. The researchers determined there was a lack of accepted standards or consistency about what constituted excellence and that interactive elements and dynamic maps, graphics and video were present in the majority of award winners. Read the article here.

Journalism Practice

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Journalism Studies

YearAuthor(s)JournalArticleVolumeIssue
2018Lucas Graves
Journalism StudiesBoundaries Not Drawn195

Exploring the phenomenon of fact-checking, this exceptional article achieves a number of important things that a journal article should do. It (1) explores historical and institutional background on fact-checking as a movement, (2) presents an innovative theoretical framework for analysing fact-checking sites, and (3) provides empirical evidence to examine this framework, impressively using existing theoretical strands in journalism scholarship to make sense of fact-checking, and (4) it does all this from an international perspective through focusing on international summits of fact-checkers. All this makes Graves’ study a true highlight in last year’s collection of papers published in Journalism Studies. Graves demonstrates exceptional grasp of the literature as it relates to his topic, and identifies how his findings contribute to driving further work in related areas, such as what his findings mean for the study of journalistic boundaries. The article is also written in a very accessible way, providing a comprehensive overview of different kinds of fact-checkers and how these can be understood. There is no doubt that this article will inspire scholarship not merely on fact-checking, but also broader concerns, e.g. boundary discourse, professionalization, and others, for years to come. Read the article here.

Journalism Studies

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