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Global Discourse

Forthcoming Issues

Deadline: 2 September 2019

Forthcoming issues

Global Discourse publishes themed issues only. This list provides authors with overviews of those themes in order to identify opportunities for contribution. Overviews without calls for submissions, indicated by deadlines, should be understood to be in press. Details of deadlines and instructions for submission of papers are provided within each overview of open issues. Please address any queries to the Editor, Matthew Johnson, at m.johnson@lancaster.ac.uk

Global Discourse

Language: en-US

Publisher: Routledge

Visit Journal

Global Discourse-Forthcoming Issues 2019

YearEditor(s)Title of IssueVolumeIssue
2019 Debra DeLaet (debra.delaet@drake.edu) and Renee Cramer (renee.cramer@drake.edu)Gender, Sexuality, and the Law93
2019Roger Haydon Mitchell (r.h.mitchell@lancaster.ac.uk)Cultivating New Post-Secular Political Space94
2019Jan Grzymski (j.grzymski@lazarski.edu.pl) and Russell Foster (russell.1.foster@kcl.ac.uk)The Limits of EU-rope91
2019Stuart Sim (stuartsim2@aol.com) and
Mark Edward (m.d.edward22@gmail.com)
Reflections on Post-Marxism: Laclau and Mouffe’s Project of Radical Democracy in the Twenty-First Century92
2019Sophie Long (slong07@qub.ac.uk)Militancy and the Working Class

93
2019Valdimar Halldórsson (hrafnseyri@hrafnseyri.is) and Elizabeth Campbell (campbelle@marshall.edu)Grounding affect: what are the implications of transformative collaboration?

94

Submission Guidelines

  • Abstracts of 400 words: 1st May 2018
  • Articles (solicited on the basis of review of abstracts): 1st August 2018
  • Publication: Late 2020
  • Please submit all abstracts and articles to the Guest Editor
  • Further details: http://www.tandfonline.com/rgld

Instructions for authors

Full instructions available here

2020: Volume 10: Issue 1

Sovereignty

Edited by Simon Mabon, Lancaster University (s.mabon@lancaster.ac.uk)

Abstract        

Amidst crises on a global and local scale, questions about the nature of sovereignty in the contemporary world are central to understanding the political. This special issue explores the implications of contested sovereignty in a range of fields and examines a number of themes identified by Richardson Institute partner organisations as central to understanding a wide range of challenges in global politics.

Abstracts of 400 words: 1st November 2018

Articles (solicited on the basis of review of abstracts): 1st February 2019

Publication: Early 2020

Please submit all abstracts and articles to the Guest Editor

Editor contact details: Simon Mabon (s.mabon@lancaster.ac.uk)

2020: Volume 10: Issue 2

Housing and homelessness

Edited by Kelly Greenop (k.greenop1@uq.edu.au) and Cameron Parsell (c.parsell@uq.edu.au), University of Queensland

Abstract        

Housing is amongst the most fundamental of human needs, yet it is in crisis across the globe. Housing is enshrined as one of the universal rights to which all humans are entitled, and is correlated with the standards of residents’ health, education, transportation and safety. Nonetheless, housing has reduced in quality and availability in the West over recent decades, and access to housing is decreasing in many countries. Problems of housing affordability, limited housing types, increasing urbanisation and the corresponding issue of densification of existing urban areas combine to produce new urban settings in which housing fulfills a changed role. In key world cities, housing has become a means of parking excess global capital for the uber wealthy, resulting in its use value as shelter for citizens becoming a secondary, and often unfulfilled objective. Particular groups are vulnerable within these changed settings - young adults, Indigenous and migrant populations, and older single people. This volume will draw together analyses of local housing settings that exemplify global trends in which housing access, housing stress, housing precarity, housing fit (or lack of fit) with culture and homelessness, and local approaches to remedy these issues, are key topics.

Invited Contributors

Abstracts of 400 words: 1st May 2019

Articles (solicited on the basis of review of abstracts): 1st August 2019

Publication: Mid 2020

Please submit all abstracts and articles to the Guest Editor

Editor contact details: Kelly Greenop (k.greenop1@uq.edu.au) and Cameron Parsell (c.parsell@uq.edu.au)

2020: Volume 10: Issue 3

Staying with Speculation: Natures, Futures, Politics

Edited by Luke R. Moffat, Lancaster University (l.moffat@lancaster.ac.uk)

Abstract        

In the past decade, speculation has become an increasingly widespread concept in disciplines across the sciences, arts and humanities. Its applications are as diverse as designing urban futures, studying geological phenomena and imagining future participatory politics. That speculative methods and practices often place importance on unpredictability would seem to make the approach unattractive to planning and design. However, speculation is increasingly deployed in shaping environments, policies, cultures and products in direct ways. As a consequence, there is growing interest in disparate, but often overlapping, conceptual, theoretical and practical elements of speculative research methods. As this cross-disciplinary pool of research about speculation grows, questions emerge about its potential, as well as its concrete ramifications. Speculation and speculative methods are often seen as catalysts for change. Staying with Speculation brings together researchers and practitioners from a range of fields to examine the implications and applications of the approach in terms of dealing with core ethical, methodological and practical issues that we face in an era of volatile unpredictability.

This is essential since, although there is discussion of speculation in design, sociological and philosophical literatures, exchange between researchers and practitioners is still quite rare – a phenomenon demonstrated by the lack of a coherent, shared vocabulary of and on the approach. Issues to be examined include:

  • the ethical and political questions regarding the deployment of speculation both within and beyond academic contexts
  • the implication of speculation on disciplinary boundaries
  • the identify of those on whose behalf research practices speculate
  • the potential for speculation to be both an inclusive and exclusionary practice
  • and the potential for speculative practices to address global challenges such as climate change, urban futures and political practices in the wake of Brexit

Abstracts of 400 words: 1st November 2018

Articles (solicited on the basis of review of abstracts): 1st February 2019

Publication: Late 2019

Please submit all abstracts and articles to the Guest Editor

Editor contact details: Luke R. Moffat, Lancaster University (l.moffat@lancaster.ac.uk)