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Ergonomics

Special Issue of Ergonomics on Computational Modelling in Ergonomics

Deadline: 30 April 2019

Complex problems are increasingly being examined through a systems ergonomics lens (Karsh et al, 2014; Salmon et al, 2017; Walker et al, 2017). In line with this, a range of systems ergonomics methods have either been developed or have experienced a resurgence in popularity since the turn of the century. Whilst their utility is assured, a persistent criticism of these approaches is that they provide only static descriptions of what are dynamic problems and systems.  

Computational modelling approaches such as Systems Dynamics (Sterman, 2012) and Agent-Based Modelling (Bonabeau, 2002) go beyond current systems ergonomics methods by providing the capacity to dynamically simulate the behaviour of complex sociotechnical systems. As such they provide Ergonomists with the potential to simulate both ergonomics problems and the likely impact of ergonomics solutions. Whilst these methods have a respectable history of application in the social sciences, they are only recently being employed by Ergonomists. As such, there is an emerging body of work in which computational modelling approaches are being used to tackle Ergonomics problems such as workplace injury, transport safety, and sports injury.

The aim of this special issue is three-fold; to provide a platform for communicating contemporary Ergonomics research involving the use of computational modelling approaches, to showcase the capacity of these approaches to dynamically model Ergonomics problems, and to inspire the Ergonomics community to pursue further applications involving these approaches. It also provides an opportunity to reflect on the potential role of computational modelling approaches in Ergonomics research and practice.

Ergonomics

Language: en-US

Publisher: tandf

Visit Journal Articles

Manuscripts are welcomed on,

  • Studies involving the use of computational modelling approaches to investigate complex Ergonomics problems;
  • Studies involving the use of computational modelling approaches to investigate the potential impact of Ergonomics interventions;
  • Case studies involving the use of computational modelling approaches;
  • Studies involving the integration of computational modelling approaches with existing Ergonomics methods;

but not restricted to:

  • Methods reviews comparing and contrasting computational modelling approaches;
  • Methods reviews comparing and contrasting computational modelling approaches with existing systems ergonomics methods;
  • Commentaries/position papers on the role of computational modelling approaches within Ergonomics; and
  • Commentaries/position papers on future Ergonomics application areas for computational modelling approaches.

Instructions for Authors

The deadline for receipt of papers is 28th February 2019, with a projected publication date of January 2020.  All papers will be subject to the standard peer-review procedures of the journal. Potential authors are requested to submit an abstract for consideration to Dr Gemma Read (gread@usc.edu.au), Professor Paul Salmon (psalmon@usc.edu.au), Dr Jason Thompson (Jason.thompson@unimelb.edu.au) or Professor Rod McClure (rmcclure@une.edu.au) prior to finalising their submission so that the Guest Editors can ensure its scope and quality is suitable for the special issue.

Following approval, papers should be submitted online via the Taylor and Francis Scholar One Manuscript submission site (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/terg). When specifying ‘Article Type’ authors should select ‘SI: Computational Modelling in Ergonomics’. Failure to do so will cause the papers to go unrecognised as belonging to the special issue.

Editorial information

  • Guest Editor: Gemma Read, Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems University of the Sunshine Coast (gread@usc.edu.au )
  • Guest Editor: Paul Salmon, Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems University of the Sunshine Coast (psalmon@usc.edu.au)
  • Guest Editor: Jason Thompson, University of Melbourne (Jason.thompson@unimelb.edu.au)
  • Guest Editor: Rod McClure, University of New England (rmcclure@une.edu.au )