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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal

Stress

For an Article Collection on

Early life stress exposure and neurodevelopment: predicting and preventing stress-related disorders

Manuscript deadline
09 June 2023

Cover image - Stress

Article collection guest advisor(s)

Dr Kathleen E Morrison, Department of Psychology, West Virginia University

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Early life stress exposure and neurodevelopment: predicting and preventing stress-related disorders

Exposure to stressful events, especially those that are chronic, unpredictable, or severe, is a significant risk factor for disorders of the brain and body later in life. The evidence for this relationship is especially strong if the stressful events occur at particular times in the lifespan, namely from the perinatal window through adolescence. These ‘early life’ experiences confer risk to later life dysfunction. Importantly, it has also been established that there are ways to mitigate the potential negative consequences of early life stress.

Despite the established relationship between early life stress and later life disease, there is still much to understand about the mechanistic underpinnings that confer risk to body, brain, and behavioral dysfunction throughout the lifespan. A deeper understanding of the way that exposure to stressors interacts with other risk factors (social environment, sex/gender, genetic risk, resources) is critical to further our understanding of the complexity of risk. Further, we also need to understand the ways in which risk can be mitigated, as the prevention of the stressful events themselves is not always feasible. It is important to know what kinds of preventative measures are effective, the kinds of measures that can be put into place in the wake of a traumatic event, and the mechanistic underpinnings of all types of risk mitigation.

This collection will bring together leading scholars in the area of early life stress to cover the breadth of research on this important topic. Both Original Research and Reviews are welcome as part of this collection. There are several themes that will be addressed by the studies in this collection. These include studies that represent a diversity of species, that span basic to clinical work, and that include manipulations and/or measures that are hypothesized to determine risk or resilience to negative outcomes. Additionally, studies that include a variety of consequences of early life stress, such as neural, metabolic, immune, behavioral, and more, are welcome.

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All manuscripts submitted to this Article Collection will undergo desk assessment and peer-review as part of our standard editorial process. Guest Advisors for this collection will not be involved in peer-reviewing manuscripts unless they are an existing member of the Editorial Board. Please review the journal Aims and Scope and author submission instructions prior to submitting a manuscript.

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