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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal

Plant Signaling & Behavior

For an Article Collection on

Volatile communication in plant stress responses: advances and perspectives

Manuscript deadline
31 July 2023

Cover image - Plant Signaling & Behavior

Article collection guest advisor(s)

Jurgen Engelberth, The University of Texas, USA
[email protected]

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Volatile communication in plant stress responses: advances and perspectives

Plants often emit a bouquet of volatile organic compounds (VOC) when under stress. The composition of these bouquets is often quite complex and may contain terpenes, phenylpropanes, and lipid-derived compounds including green leaf volatiles among others. VOC have mainly been described as signal that regulate the interaction with other organisms, for example by attracting pollinators or, in case of insect herbivory, by serving as a homing signal for natural enemies of the attacking herbivore. However, individual compounds of these blends have also been found to act as signals that can be used by distant parts of the same plant or by neighboring plants to prepare and protect them against a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses by activating distinct but yet to be characterized signaling pathways, thereby providing important information about the cause of stress in a spatial and temporal manner as well as the activation of protective responses. While new compounds with potential signalling qualities are published regularly, little is still known about specific signalling pathways and general physiological responses in plants, that may help to better understand the relevance of this type of communication utilized by plants and how this allows them to cope with the plethora of environmental stresses they are constantly exposed to.

The purpose of this collection is therefore to collect and disseminate recent findings and developments regarding signals, responses, and physiological and ecological consequences caused by plant volatile organic compounds.

Potential topics for this collection include, but are not limited to:

  • volatile organic compounds
  • plant-plant communication
  • plant stress responses
  • signalling
  • physiological responses
  • ecological consequences

We welcome the following article types for this collection:

  • original research papers
  • reviews
  • short communications
  • technical reports
  • commentaries.

Dr. Jurgen Engelberth has a Ph.D. in plant physiology from the Ruhr University Bochum, Germany. After working at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and at USDA, ARS, CMAVE in Gainesville, FL, he joined the biology faculty at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). He is currently an Associate Professor for plant biochemistry. He is an Associate Editor for Plant Signaling and Behavior and Plants. His work is focussed on plant-plant interactions by volatiles signals in response to biotic and abiotic stresses.

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All manuscripts submitted to this Article Collection will undergo desk assessment and peer-review as part of our standard editorial process. Guest Advisors for this collection will not be involved in peer-reviewing manuscripts unless they are an existing member of the Editorial Board. Please review the journal Aims and Scope and author submission instructions prior to submitting a manuscript.

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