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Submit a Manuscript to the Journal

Cancer Biology & Therapy

For an Article Collection on

Regulated Cell Death in Cancer Progression

Manuscript deadline
30 November 2023

Cover image - Cancer Biology & Therapy

Article collection guest advisor(s)

Dr. Wei Zhao, Chengdu Medical College
[email protected]

Prof. Zhe-Sheng Chen, St. John’s University
[email protected]

Dr. An Zhao, Institute of Cancer Research, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital
[email protected]

Submit an ArticleVisit JournalArticles

Regulated Cell Death in Cancer Progression

Cell death is mainly divided into 2 types: regulated cell death (RCD) and accidental cell death (ACD). ACD is triggered by accidental injury stimuli, which exceed the adjustable ability of cells, resulting in cell death. RCD refers to the autonomous and orderly death of cells controlled by genes in order to maintain the stability of the internal environment. Based on the morphological criteria, cellular context, and triggering stimulus, RCD types mainly include: autophagy-dependent cell death, apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, entosis, NETosis, lysosome-dependent cell death (LCD), alkaliptosis, and oxeiptosis. Emerging data proves that RCD plays a key role in human diseases including, cancers. Promising therapeutic drugs which induce or inhibit RCD, have been reported to abrogate cancer initiation and progression. For a more comprehensive understanding and clarification of this RCD-related molecular mechanism in cancer progression, further studies are critical.

 

Researchers identified RCD affects cancer progression and response to treatment. The dysregulated RCD pathway evades anti-cancer treatment-induced cell death, and avoiding RCD is one of the important signs of cancer progression. Furthermore, the application of the RCD signal to a specific cancer type or multiple target drugs can be avoided by the single or combined application of the RCD signal. Here, the main purpose of this article collection is to identify and screen more potential molecular biomarkers or targets in RCD as well as clarify the drugs' therapeutic effects related to molecular mechanisms. Therefore, we encourage researchers to submit original scientific research achievements and the latest research progress highlighting this area of research.

 

The article collection welcomes manuscripts covering, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Clarify RCD molecular mechanism in cancer progression;
  • Screening drugs or compounds inducing or inhibiting RCD in cancer cells;
  • Efficacy evaluation of compounds which target RCD of cancer cells;
  • The molecular mechanism of compounds in treating cancer via RCD signal pathway;
  • Novel therapeutic approach for RCD to cure cancer.

 

We welcome manuscripts, such as original research (basic science, translational, clinical trial), and review articles (both comprehensive overviews and mini-reviews).

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All manuscripts submitted to this Article Collection will undergo desk assessment and peer-review as part of our standard editorial process. Guest Advisors for this collection will not be involved in peer-reviewing manuscripts unless they are an existing member of the Editorial Board. Please review the journal Aims and Scope and author submission instructions prior to submitting a manuscript.

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